Robb Cemetery, rural Warren County, Indiana

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You can see more of my pictures at the following link  Robb Cemetery by cjp02 on Flickr

Robb cemetery is located beside Indiana State Road 28, between Williamsport and West Lebanon, in rural Warren County, Indiana.

This one of four cemeteries in rural Washington Township, Warren County, Indiana.  According to Find A Grave  there are approximately 80 known burials in this old cemetery, the earliest from the early 1830’s. A lot of the headstones are weather worn, and have fallen over and broken, although the grass seems like it is kept trimmed.
Washington Township is one of twelve townships in Warren County, Indiana, United States. It is the most populous township in the county; according to the 2010 census, its population was 2,298, with 1,898 of those living in Williamsport. The area that became Washington Township was first settled in 1827. Originally, the county was divided into four townships when it was formed in 1827; Washington Township was created a few years later in March 1830. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Township,_Warren_County,_Indiana
Warren County lies in western Indiana between the Illinois state line and the Wabash River in the United States. According to the 2010 census, the population was 8,508. The county seat is Williamsport. Before the arrival of non-indigenous settlers in the early 19th century, the area was inhabited by several Native American tribes. The county was officially established in 1827 and was the 55th county to be formed in Indiana. It is one of the most rural counties in the state, with the third-smallest population and the lowest population density at about 23 inhabitants per square mile. The county was established on March 1, 1827, by the Indiana General Assembly. It was named for Dr. Joseph Warren, who was killed in 1775 at the Battle of Bunker Hill in which he fought as a private because his commission as a general had not yet taken effect. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren_County,_Indiana
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Construction of Wabash and Erie Canal was deadly

Construction of Wabash and Erie Canal was deadly

Bob Quirk Oct 1, 2016
From the Journal Review newspaper and website.
http://www.journalreview.com/news/life/article_ddccf59e-8792-11e6-a46a-6b9ce8acfba0.html

The Wabash and Eric Canal was started in 1832 in Fort Wayne. It reached Fountain County in 1846 and when completed in 1853 was the longest artificial waterway in the country.

Transportation in the days before the canal was quite inadequate. The population of the state was growing and better transportation was badly needed to ship out the surplus farm produce and to bring in the much needed supplies for the pioneer families.

The canal being close to the Wabash river and running through swamps and low lands, malaria became a problem and later cholera made its appearance. The work was done by Irish immigrants who had been forced out of Ireland by the potato famine. These laborers died by the hundreds, and the death rate was so high that the digging of graves was almost as big a job as digging the canal. The situation was to grow so terrible that for every six feet of completed channel it had cost the life of one human being.

The laborers who died from the cholera in Fountain County were buried in a cemetery at Maysville, a thriving village of this period between Attica and Riverside, also on a plot of land in Shawnee Township on the Bodine farm, 2 1/2 miles north of the village of Fountain. Others were buried in the corner of Portland Arch Cemetery.

Even from the beginning it was necessary to distribute large doses of quinine, calomel and “Blue Mass” to the workers, with the whiskey-bearing jigger boss making the rounds three times a day, and six times on Sunday.

The Canal’s troubles did not end with the plagues, for when they were not burying their dead they were fighting each other, since the Irish workers on the project were about equally divided between men from North and South Ireland, Cork and Ulster. This meant a general skull cracking on religious grounds whenever two of them met.

It was a hard life for the laborers and living conditions were very bad. The dirt was moved by pick and shovel and wheelbarrows. It was the hardest kind of work, done under very difficult conditions.

There were many jobs to be done beside digging the canal. A supply of water had to be provided which usually required damming one of the tributary streams entering the Wabash River and raising its level so that water could be led from above the dam to the main canal by means of feeder canals. Aqueducts had to be built across some of the creeks. These were huge wooden troughs the width and depth of the canal and supported on posts or stone piers and with a plank tow path built on the side for horses. In some cases, streams were crossed by damming them at the opposite bank of the canal and raising the level of the creek to that of the canal thereby providing a water supply as well as a crossing.

Thus with the coming of the canal, local farmers had a market for the surplus farm goods and manufactured goods from the east were made available to them.

Soon there were passenger boats for people to travel on. I will tell about them in my next article.
Bob Quirk is a retired educator and historian. He contributes this column to the Journal Review.

http://www.journalreview.com/news/life/article_ddccf59e-8792-11e6-a46a-6b9ce8acfba0.html

Shawnee Bridge, between Warren and Fountain Counties, IN

The Shawnee Bridge, is a through truss bridge, crossing the Wabash River, between Warren and Fountain Counties in Indiana, was built in 1905, by the Attica Bridge Co. of Attica, Indiana. It was rehabilitated in 1980. It is a two lane wide bridge, still open to vehicular traffic, but with a 10 feet height restriction. It has a total length of a little over 800 feet, made up of five approximately 160 feet long trusses.

It is located south of the Warren County seat of Williamsport, Indiana, and the small unincorporated town of Portland Arch, which is itself north of the Fountain County seat of Covington, Indiana.

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Bridge Plaque Text:-

1905

Built by
The Attica Bridge Co.
Attica, Indiana.

R.L. Winks E.C. Livengood
Co. Auditor James C. Hall
W.H. Gemmer Ben.R. Gephart
Co. Engineer Co. Commrs.

Bridgehunter page http://bridgehunter.com/in/warren/8600029/

Williamsport is a town in Washington Township, Warren County, Indiana, United States. It is the county seat of Warren County and is the largest of the four incorporated towns in the county. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williamsport,_Indiana

Covington is a city in and the county seat of Fountain County, Indiana, United States. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covington,_Indiana

The Wabash River is a 503-mile-long (810 km) river in the Midwestern United States that flows southwest from northwest Ohio near Fort Recovery across northern Indiana to southern Illinois, where it forms the Illinois-Indiana border before draining into the Ohio River, of which it is the largest northern tributary. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabash_River

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMM168_Shawnee_Bridge_between_Warren_and_Fountain_Counties_IN