Wabash and Erie Canal

Wabash and Erie Canal

Indiana was incorporated as a state in 1816, Fountain County, in 1825, and Attica was laid out and platted, also in 1825. The building of the Erie Canal in upstate New York proved so successful that the residents of Indiana saw the potential of such a canal here.

After much debate, on Feb. 23, 1832, formal ground breaking took place in Fort Wayne and in July 1832, actual construction took place and worked southwest; it reached Lafayette by 1842. The construction progressed slowly, reaching Covington in 1846 and by 1847, the canal reached Lodi in southern Fountain County. Now Fountain County was connected to Lake Erie by canal, and by 1847 traffic had begun to flow through the county via the canal. The canal had reached Terre Haute in 1849 and was completed to Evansville in 1853.

When completed the canal was 458 miles long and was the longest artificial waterway in this country and second only to the Grand Canal in China. The canal was 26 feet wide at the bottom and 40 feet at the top and contained 4 feet of water. The towpath on one side was 10 feet wide and 4 feet above water level. The locks were 60 feet long and 15 feet wide

At Fountain (Portland Arch) was the widest part of the canal between Terre Haute and Lafayette. It was the only place between the two towns that boats could pass. Warehouses were located at Mayville, Attica, Jamestown, Fountain, Covington, Sarah, Vicksburg and Silver Island. At these Fountain County locations merchandise was unloaded from the canal boats. For the next few years, these towns flourished from the traffic between Lake Erie and the Mouth of the Mississippi via the Ohio River.

The coming of the county’s first railroad, the Wabash and Western Railroad line, built through Attica, in 1858, heralded the end of the canal’s usefulness. By 1860, portions south of Terre Haute were closed and the process of decline continued northward. In the end, the canal was too expensive to maintain, and when less costly railroads were completed nearby, its use declined dramatically. Around 1875, the last canal boat passed through Covington, and In 1876, the entire canal in Indiana was sold at auction.

——————————————————————

An article by Bob Quirk, published in the Journal Review.

Erie Canal reaches Fountain County in 1846

The Wabash and Erie Canal reached northern Fountain county during the drought year of 1846. This drought brought about an event which came to be known as the “Attica and Covington War”.

The drought had caused the water level to be low in the canal and water from the Wabash River was also low. When the water from the Wabash River was finally directed to the canal it was found there was barely enough of it to flood the canal to Attica and none for the Covington section of the canal.

The Daniel Webster, a beautiful line boat, arrived in Attica after much difficulty and could go no further. The publisher of the Attica Journal printed an exaggerated report of the boats’ arrival in Attica.

When the lock at Attica was opened and only the barest trickle of water came through, Covington suspected the worst. They thought Attica was closing off the flow of water to keep Covington from using the canal.

Covington Senator Hannegan, who happened to be home from Washington, offered his influence of his position and his ability to debate, if a local committee would accompany him to Attica and get them to open the flood gate. The visit was made but with no success and they returned to Covington.

By daylight the next morning Senator Hannegan and 300 townsmen and farmers armed with clubs stormed up the river to Attica.

The news of their approach was quickly spread and a well armed wagon load of men dispatched. However, the Attican’s arrived too late and in a matter of minutes they were surrounded, captured, disarmed and held prisoner.

The invaders forced their way through Attica and succeeded in opening the floodgates, letting the precious water into the lower section.

Reinforced by additional villagers and crews of the helpless boats, the Attican’s attempted to reclose the flood gates. However, it was too late and in a matter of minutes the thirty canal boats lay topsy turvey, mired in the mud, dumping their precious cargo overboard.

Thus the Covington-Attica canal war was over with victory going to neither town. The fourteen mile section had absorbed all of the ensuing water, not leaving enough to float a raft, much less a canal boat.

However, this was not the end of the canal. It wasn’t long until the drought ended and there was sufficient water and it was reopened.

At first packet boats did not run on a schedule. They started their trips after a profitable number of passengers was assured to be on board. The distance a boat traveled from Toledo to Attica was 267 miles and it took about 2 and half days and cost $3.75. An advertisement in a Ft. Wayne newspaper read: fast sailing “Niagra has large stateroom with 3 meals a day.

As demand increased, boats were designed for freight and passenger separately. The passenger boats were even designed in two classes. One class was for passengers who wanted to arrive at their destination quickly and the other was designed more luxuriously and traveled 5 to 8 miles per hour. They charged one to two cents a mile or more for a ticket.

The internal arrangement had a small covered cabin for the crew. Next was a wash room and drawing room and then the women’s cabin. Next was a large room usually about 45 feet long which served many purposes.

During the day it was a place of general assembly and it was there that 3 meals a day were served. At night it was converted into a floating dormitory. There were about 42 bunks of small shelves of wood, about six feet long and one and half foot wide. The beds were covered with a thin clump of straw and a flat bag of blue canvas. A blanket and pillow completed the bedding supplies.

When it was time to retire a man would take off his hat, neck tie and collar, coat and vest and climb into bed. If he was unusually finicky, he would also take off his shoes and trousers before climbing into bed, but if he did those extras he was considered finicky.

In the morning before breakfast they lined up to wash in a tin basin filled with water from the canal. A comb and brush hung near the place where food was being prepared.

A show boat called, “The Dixie Boys Minstrel Show” operated along the canal. It had a seating capacity of 100.

P.T. Barnum’s Circus came to Attica in 1879. Tom Thumb, three elephants, a band of clowns gave a great show. The boats ran from March 1st until November 1st.

A tin horn announced the arrival and departure of the canal boat at each post.

The canal played an important part in the development of West Central Indiana, However, with the coming of the railroad, the canal era came to an end in the 1870’s.

http://www.journalreview.com/news/article_a31c3bda-1974-11e1-b039-001cc4c002e0.html

——————————————————————

This wedding was held on a canal boat on May 16, 1872, in Attica, Indiana, on the Erie Canal. http://www.in.gov/history/images/canalwedding.gif

Attica canal wedding

——————————————————————

Further Reading:-

A couple of interesting articles, originally published in the Journal Review newspaper, written by Bob Quick are:-
http://www.journalreview.com/news/article_265516fc-01c9-11e1-adad-001cc4c002e0.html
http://www.journalreview.com/news/article_a31c3bda-1974-11e1-b039-001cc4c002e0.html

Some of the history of Attica is detailed on the city’s website http://attica-in.gov/visiting-attica/history-of-attica/

The Attica page on Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attica,_Indiana

Advertisements

Indian Creek Hill Cemetery Veterans Memorial – rural Montgomery County, IN

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Situated at the front of the Indian Creek Hill Cemetery, right next to Indiana State Road 47, this memorial commemorates all veterans. It comprises a large stone, the text of which is given below, a flag pole and flag, and a pair of stone benches.

Memorial text:-

Indian Creek Hill
Cemetery
Veterans Memorial

Dedicated to the gallant men
and women who served their
country during war and peace.

They stood, were counted and
served their country with honor.

We honor the loved ones
who waited for their return

We shall not forget.

Indian Creek Hill Cemetery is located beside Indiana State Road 47, south west of the town of New Market, between Crawfordsville and Waveland, IN.

The cemetery is situated on a small hill. The oldest graves can be found in the center of this well kept cemetery, near the top of the hill.

According to Find A Grave http://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=85513 there are currently approximately 1475 interments.

This cemetery is located in Brown Township, and is one of the eight cemeteries in this township.

Brown Township is one of eleven townships in Montgomery County, Indiana. As of the 2010 Census, there were 1719 residents of Brown Township.

Wikipedia Brown Twp. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Township,_Montgomery_County,_Indiana

Wikipedia Montgomery County page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montgomery_County,_Indiana

This cemetery on Waymarking.com http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMKY78

This Veteran’s Memorial on Waymarking.com http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMM0HK

2015 Lafayette car show

This Saturday, May 23, 2015, there will be a car show at A&W/Long John Silver restaurant at 2839 Teal Road, in Lafayette, Indiana 47905. 

Registration is from 11AM until 1PM, awards at 4PM. $10 entry, door prizes, and music from Fat Rat DJ. For further information call Chuck on 765-363-0954

Sugar Creek flood, April 19th, 2013

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Elston Park, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

The historic flooding of Sugar Creek, seen at the Lafayette Avenue road bridge, over Sugar Creek, in Crawfordsville, Indiana, April 19th, 2013. The road was closed to vehicular traffic, because the water level was almost up to the top of the arches, under the bridge. The Elston Softball park was closed, because it was under water, and the Creekside Lodge restaurant and lodge, was surrounded by water.

In an article in the local newspaper, the Journal Review, of Monday April 22nd, it quotes the National Weather service;

“According to the National Weather service, Sugar Creek crested Friday afternoon [April 19th] at 15.31 feet, making it the second worst flooding event since March 27, 1913, when the creek crested at 17.30 feet. Flood stage is considered at 8.0 feet.”

These pictures were taken on the Friday afternoon, around the time the creek crested.

Then and Now, Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

The old picture for this Then and Now, is from a postcard, from about 1909.

These pictures were both taken of the railroad arch, over Jennison Street, on the west side of Crawfordsville, Indiana. Taken from the south side, of the arch, looking north.

I did not have a copy of the old picture with me, therefore the perspective is a little different.

Crawfordsville Big Four Arch bridge 1909

The Big Four Arch, Crawfordsville, In, C.1909

Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

The Big Four Arch, Crawfordsville, In, January 19th, 2013.

Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

The Stone Arch bridge over Big 4 Arch Road/Dry Branch Creek on Former Conrail Railroad/Peoria Eastern Railroad. The railroad arch spans Jennison Street, which, on the south and west side of the arch becomes Big 4 Arch road. It is situated north east of the Animal Welfare League, in Crawfordsville.

Bridge Hunter page

Big 4 Rail Road on Wikipedia

Ironman on GNCC Racing

Ironman on GNCC Racing.

via Ironman on GNCC Racing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The annual Amsoil Ironman races are on this weekend, October 20th – 21st, 2012, in Crawfordsville, Indiana. Located just off of SR47, south of Crawfordsville.

I heard on the radio, that tickets to watch this event are $15 each.

Est: October 1995
The Ironman GNCC is one of the most popular races on the circuit. A local Polaris dealership hosts the event, and they get together with local farmers to get plenty of land for the track. Community support for this race is amazing. Ironman GNCC banners hang downtown, and the spectator count is incredible. The event has grown so much that it’s overflowing from race to full-on industry trade show with Yamaha, KTM and Polaris displaying next year’s models.

As far as the track, many riders call this one their favorite on the whole tour. The track has it all. The land in this area is totally flat, but the course runs near riverbanks, which means there’s still plenty of elevation change. In fact, the hills here are some of the steepest on the circuit. If it rains, the hills will be the toughest part, as the course will be routed around the creeks. If it doesn’t rain, the riders will hit the creeks, and they’re rocky. Be careful not to cut a tire there. Also, since the race runs in October, it can get cold. Try to stay dry in those creeks.
Outside of the woods, the course routes across harvested cornfields. You’ll have your machine pegged at its absolute top-speed several times here. From tight trails, to technical hillclimbs, gullies, rock sections and creeks, all on top of great dirt, this track is a true test for a cross-country racer’s all-around skills.The Ironman event is named after the late GNCC ATV Champion Bob “Ironman” Sloan, who hailed from Indiana and helped make the event happen. Godspeed, Bob.