Old Hillsboro Cemetery, Hillsboro, Indiana

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You can see more of my pictures at the following link  Old Hillsboro Cemetery by cjp02 on Flickr

Old Hillsboro cemetery is located just south of US 136, behind the Post Office, near the center of the town of Hillsboro, in Fountain County, Indiana.

This one of four cemeteries in Cain Township, Fountain County, Indiana. According to Find A Grave  there are approximately 420 burials in this old cemetery, the earliest from the early 1830’s. A lot of the headstones are weather worn, and have fallen over and broken, but some have been repaired and mounted on concrete plinths. There are 24 Civil War Veterans buried there.

The town of Hillsboro was laid out in the 1830s, and is the only settlement in Cain Township, having approximately 600 people, half the township population living there. It stands at the intersection of US 136 and Indiana State Road 341. Wikipedia

Cain Township was one of the first of the eleven townships to be established in the county on July 24, 1826. At that time, much of the land was forested, but 100 years later most of the land was used for agriculture. Wikipedia

Fountain County lies in the western part of the U.S. state of Indiana on the east side of the Wabash River. The county was officially established in 1826 and was the 53rd in Indiana. The county seat is Covington. According to the 2000 census, its population was 17,954; the 2010 population was 17,240. The county has eight incorporated towns with a total population of about 9,700, as well as many small unincorporated communities; it is also divided into eleven townships which provide local services. An interstate highway, two U.S. Routes and five Indiana state roads cross the county, as does a major railroad line. Wikipedia

The state of Indiana was established in 1816. The first non-indigenous settler in the area that became Fountain County is thought to have been a Mr. Forbes, who arrived here in early 1823 and was soon followed by others. Fountain County was officially created on December 30, 1825, the act taking effect on April 1, 1826; the boundaries of the county have not changed since that time. It was named for Major James Fontaine of Kentucky who was killed at Harmar’s Defeat (near modern Fort Wayne, Indiana) on October 22, 1790, during the Northwest Indian War. Wikipedia

 

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2015 Covington Apple Festival

 

COVINGTON, Ind. — The 25th annual Covington Apple Fest will fill the square around the Fountain County Courthouse on Saturday.

The day’s events actually start at 7 a.m. with the Fireman’s Pancake Breakfast at the fire station. It will be served until 10 a.m. EDT.

At 8 a.m. EDT, a bicycle tour sponsored by the Fountain Trust Co. will pedal off. Call the Covington Banking Center at (765) 793-2237 for information.

Events begin with a 9:45 a.m. EDT welcome from Mayor Brad Crain. Vendors will be set up around the courthouse until 5 p.m. EDT.

The Little Miss Apple of Your Eye and Johnny Appleseed contest will begin at 10 a.m. EDT. Registration for boys and girls ages 4-8 begins runs 9-9:30 a.m. EDT at festival headquarters.

A car, truck and motorcycle show runs during the event. Registration will be 9-11 a.m. EDT with trophies awarded at 2 p.m.

Tours of the historic courthouse murals by Kay Hunter are at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. The 1842 Fountain County Clerk’s Building/Museum at 516 Fourth St. will be open all day as well.

The Masonic Fish Fry will close out the day, serving from noon until 6:30 p.m. EDT at the fire station.

Entertainment Schedule

(All times EDT)

• 9:45 a.m. — Welcome; City of Covington Mayor and 2015 Apple Fest Queen

• 10-10:30 a.m. — Johnny Appleseed & Little Miss Apple of Your Eye Contest

• 10:30-11 a.m. — Joseph White, balloon artist, story teller, magician

• 11-11:30 a.m. — Covington High School Band

• 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. — Wabash Valley Area Band

• 12:30-1 p.m. — Forgiven

• 1:15-1:45 p.m. — Friendship Circle Center Line Dancers

• 2-2:45 p.m. — Curt Kiser

• 3-3:30 p.m. — Shozet Keller-Stump

• 3:30-4 p.m. — Sweet Adelines

• 4-5 p.m. — Kasey Burton

This report about the festival from the Commercial News:

http://www.commercial-news.com/news/local_news/covington-ready-for-apple-fest/article_4e842119-92f4-5aeb-a577-6149e5c206c0.html

Michaels Cemetery – rural Montgomery County, IN

Michaels Cemetery is located on County Road 250 South, locally also known as Offield Monument Road, in Union township, south of the small unincorporated town of Yountsville, in Montgomery County, Indiana.

Montgomery County was formed in 1823. It was named in honor of Richard Montgomery, an American Revolutionary War general killed in 1775 while attempting to capture Quebec City, Canada, in the Battle of Quebec.
The first county election was held in March 1823. 61 people voted in that first election. The first three county commissioners were elected – William Offield, James Blevins and John McCollough – who then ordered that the first jail and courthouse be built. County website http://montgomeryco.net/

Montgomery County (Wikipedia) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montgomery_County,_Indiana is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. As of 2010, the population was 38,124. The county seat is Crawfordsville. The county is divided into 11 townships which provide local services. Union Township is one of those eleven townships in Montgomery County, containing the County seat, Crawfordsville. As of the 2010 census, its population was 24,587 and it contained 10,723 housing units. Wabash College is located in Crawfordsville in this township.

According to Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Township,_Montgomery_County,_Indiana Union Township contains nineteen cemeteries, including this one.

According to the name sign, provided by the Township, there are approximately 14 graves in this cemetery, but Find A Grave http://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=85916 lists 16.

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMKZP4_Michaels_Cemetery_rural_Montgomery_County_IN

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Albert R Swaim memorial

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This is an unusual monument, in the shape of a musical organ. It is marking the grave of Albert R. Swaim. This can be found in the Bethany Cemetery, to the east of the town of Marshall, Indiana. Memorial Text: Albert R. Swaim, Born Oct. 28, 1843, Died Jan. 10, 1893.

According to the Find A Grave memorial page http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=5662820 “The 1870 and 1880 census shows him as a music teacher from a large farming family dating back to the 1840’s in Indiana.”

I checked the 1880 census details on Ancestry.com http://ancstry.me/1uifAFf and found the following:

1880 United States Federal Census about Albert Swaim

Name: Albert Swaim

Age: 37

Birth Year: abt 1843

Birthplace: Indiana

Home in 1880: Howard, Parke, Indiana

Race: White

Gender: Male

Relation to Head of House: Brother

Marital Status: Single

Father’s Birthplace: North Carolina

Mother’s Birthplace: Indiana

Occupation: Music Teacher

Household Members:

Name Age

James C. Swaim 24

Nancy B. Swaim 21

Emma E. Swaim 19

Louettie Swaim 16

Thomas Banta 15

Albert Swaim 37

Bethany Cemetery, is a well tended cemetery located on the north side of Indiana State Road 236, approximately one mile east of the town of Marshall, Indiana.

According to Find A Grave http://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=84311 there are currently 711 interments.

Marshall is a town in Washington Township, Parke County, Indiana, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 324. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall,_In

The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana.

The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana. The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana. The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana. This once beautiful, Queen Anne style mansion, has stood on this site, at the corner of Fourth and Alabama Streets, near downtown Lafayette, Indiana,  since 1865.

As of today, Memorial Day, May 26th, 2013, it is awaiting demolition. It had served as a private residence, then in 1929, it was used as the Soller-Baker funeral home. It has stood empty since 1996. It was scheduled for renovation as apartments, or condo’s, but the project was abandoned when it became cost-prohibitive, in 2009. Eventually, the City of Lafayette, eventually bought it, with plans to demolish it and redevelop the site. There have been many additions to the original mansion, whilst it was a funeral home. The brick additions are due to be dismantled first, starting June 4th, the main part of the mansion, about a week later.

Some history of this house, that I found by online research:-

In 1842-1843, John H. Newman and his brother-in-law Abraham Miller established a brewery in the south part of Lafayette near the Wabash & Erie Canal. Miller died shortly afterward and Newman operated the brewery for several years. In December, 1856, Newman purchased a $3,500 piece of property on the east side of Illinois (now Fourth) street south of Alabama Street from James Spears, on which he built his new brewery in 1857.

At about the same time, Newman built a large Italianate brick house with a cupola adjacent to the brewery, on the southeast corner of Fourth and Alabama Streets.

John Newman died on September 1, 1888. In 1895, George A. Bohrer bought out the Newman heirs for the sum of $12,000, acquiring the Spring Brewery and the adjacent Newman House. The house was heavily remodeled for his son, Edward F. Bohrer (who was soon to marry Miss Jennie Powers), with the addition of bay windows, a turret, a large porch, a third floor, and a completely new interior.

Prohibition went into effect in Indiana at midnight on April 2, 1918, closing both Thieme & Wagner and the George A. Bohrer Brewing Co. The George A. Bohrer Bottling Works remained open until about 1929. About that time the Bohrer Products Co., apparently a successor to the brewery, began manufacturing ice cream, selling soda water, and distributing “Cereal Beverages.” The company seems to have lasted until about 1928.

https://www.indystar.com/article/BY/20130328/NEWS02/303280024/Demolitions-hold-promise-of-future-Lafayette-development

http://n2avg.com/?p=703

http://www.jconline.com/article/20130523/NEWS/305230039/Centennial-Neighborhood-eyesores-razed-by-August

http://www.b-levi.com/lafayette/breweries/bohrer.php

 

Old Baptist Cemetery, Newtown, Indiana

Old Baptist Cemetery, Fountain County, IN

As you travel north, on old SR 55, from Wingate, through Newtown, and on towards Rob Roy and Attica, you will come across a sharp right hand curve in the road. On the left is a small country road, and over to your left, if the corn is not too high, or even not there, you will see a cemetery, about half a mile away.
That is Old Baptist Cemetery.

The Old Baptist Cemetery was established in 1811, in Richland Township, Fountain County, Indiana.  

Richland Township has seven cemeteries. Wikipedia

It is situated west of the small town of Newtown, and just south of Indiana State Road 55.

It contains 642 interments, according to Find A Grave.

This is a well kept and cared for rural cemetery, surrounded by fields, with a fairly new white vinyl fence, gate and sign.

We found six Zinc or White Bronze memorials in this cemetery.

Fielding Slusser DSCF8660 Washington and Permelia Rice Edward C Rice Abednego Rice & son Frank Willam and Elizabeth Stephens

Then and Now, Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

The old picture for this Then and Now, is from a postcard, from about 1909.

These pictures were both taken of the railroad arch, over Jennison Street, on the west side of Crawfordsville, Indiana. Taken from the south side, of the arch, looking north.

I did not have a copy of the old picture with me, therefore the perspective is a little different.

Crawfordsville Big Four Arch bridge 1909

The Big Four Arch, Crawfordsville, In, C.1909

Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

The Big Four Arch, Crawfordsville, In, January 19th, 2013.

Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

The Stone Arch bridge over Big 4 Arch Road/Dry Branch Creek on Former Conrail Railroad/Peoria Eastern Railroad. The railroad arch spans Jennison Street, which, on the south and west side of the arch becomes Big 4 Arch road. It is situated north east of the Animal Welfare League, in Crawfordsville.

Bridge Hunter page

Big 4 Rail Road on Wikipedia