Albert R Swaim memorial

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This is an unusual monument, in the shape of a musical organ. It is marking the grave of Albert R. Swaim. This can be found in the Bethany Cemetery, to the east of the town of Marshall, Indiana. Memorial Text: Albert R. Swaim, Born Oct. 28, 1843, Died Jan. 10, 1893.

According to the Find A Grave memorial page http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=5662820 “The 1870 and 1880 census shows him as a music teacher from a large farming family dating back to the 1840’s in Indiana.”

I checked the 1880 census details on Ancestry.com http://ancstry.me/1uifAFf and found the following:

1880 United States Federal Census about Albert Swaim

Name: Albert Swaim

Age: 37

Birth Year: abt 1843

Birthplace: Indiana

Home in 1880: Howard, Parke, Indiana

Race: White

Gender: Male

Relation to Head of House: Brother

Marital Status: Single

Father’s Birthplace: North Carolina

Mother’s Birthplace: Indiana

Occupation: Music Teacher

Household Members:

Name Age

James C. Swaim 24

Nancy B. Swaim 21

Emma E. Swaim 19

Louettie Swaim 16

Thomas Banta 15

Albert Swaim 37

Bethany Cemetery, is a well tended cemetery located on the north side of Indiana State Road 236, approximately one mile east of the town of Marshall, Indiana.

According to Find A Grave http://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=84311 there are currently 711 interments.

Marshall is a town in Washington Township, Parke County, Indiana, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 324. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall,_In

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Old Baptist Cemetery, Newtown, Indiana

Old Baptist Cemetery, Fountain County, IN

As you travel north, on old SR 55, from Wingate, through Newtown, and on towards Rob Roy and Attica, you will come across a sharp right hand curve in the road. On the left is a small country road, and over to your left, if the corn is not too high, or even not there, you will see a cemetery, about half a mile away.
That is Old Baptist Cemetery.

The Old Baptist Cemetery was established in 1811, in Richland Township, Fountain County, Indiana.  

Richland Township has seven cemeteries. Wikipedia

It is situated west of the small town of Newtown, and just south of Indiana State Road 55.

It contains 642 interments, according to Find A Grave.

This is a well kept and cared for rural cemetery, surrounded by fields, with a fairly new white vinyl fence, gate and sign.

We found six Zinc or White Bronze memorials in this cemetery.

Fielding Slusser DSCF8660 Washington and Permelia Rice Edward C Rice Abednego Rice & son Frank Willam and Elizabeth Stephens

White Bronze Cemetery Monuments

White Bronze Cemetery Monuments

Greenlawn Cemetry, Wingate, IN

The John and Ephriam Luse monument, at Greenlawn Cemetery, Wingate, Indiana.

I found several interesting web pages detailing the history of White Bronze Cemetery Monuments, that are actually made from pure Zinc. They look like marble, with a greyish white color, with a hint of blue. These beautiful monuments and stones were made in Connecticut, for only about 40 years, from about 1874 until 1914, but can be seen across most of the United States, and Canada. They are fairly rare, and but even have their own Waymarking.com category…

http://www.waymarking.com/cat/details.aspx?f=1&guid=210ed699-7c91-403b-9b64-3020fe994b86

I am going to be looking out for some of these to photograph and waymark …

Other websites of interest:-

(Clicking these links will open a new window)

http://gombessa.tripod.com/scienceleadstheway/id8.html

http://familytrees.wordpress.com/2008/07/01/tombstone-tuesday-zinc-or-white-bronze/

http://www.uni.edu/connors/metalmon.htm

http://vintageviews.org/vv-tl/pages/Cem_Monuments.htm

http://tombstone-treasuresbeyondbones.blogspot.com/2011/09/history-of-white-bronze.html?m=1

http://agraveinterest.blogspot.com/2012/06/white-bronze-monument-of-quality.html?m-1

http://www.civilwarmonument.org/monumental_bronze.htm

In Alamo, one man’s towering testament to hard feelings and payback

ALAMO — When you go, what do you hope to leave behind so people remember?

Joseph M. Willis, a patent medicine maker near the turn of the 20th century and a man a newspaper of his day concluded was “peculiar to the extreme,” had an idea about that.

If you’re heading the back way from Lafayette to Shades State Park, Continue reading