Construction of Wabash and Erie Canal was deadly

Construction of Wabash and Erie Canal was deadly

Bob Quirk Oct 1, 2016
From the Journal Review newspaper and website.
http://www.journalreview.com/news/life/article_ddccf59e-8792-11e6-a46a-6b9ce8acfba0.html

The Wabash and Eric Canal was started in 1832 in Fort Wayne. It reached Fountain County in 1846 and when completed in 1853 was the longest artificial waterway in the country.

Transportation in the days before the canal was quite inadequate. The population of the state was growing and better transportation was badly needed to ship out the surplus farm produce and to bring in the much needed supplies for the pioneer families.

The canal being close to the Wabash river and running through swamps and low lands, malaria became a problem and later cholera made its appearance. The work was done by Irish immigrants who had been forced out of Ireland by the potato famine. These laborers died by the hundreds, and the death rate was so high that the digging of graves was almost as big a job as digging the canal. The situation was to grow so terrible that for every six feet of completed channel it had cost the life of one human being.

The laborers who died from the cholera in Fountain County were buried in a cemetery at Maysville, a thriving village of this period between Attica and Riverside, also on a plot of land in Shawnee Township on the Bodine farm, 2 1/2 miles north of the village of Fountain. Others were buried in the corner of Portland Arch Cemetery.

Even from the beginning it was necessary to distribute large doses of quinine, calomel and “Blue Mass” to the workers, with the whiskey-bearing jigger boss making the rounds three times a day, and six times on Sunday.

The Canal’s troubles did not end with the plagues, for when they were not burying their dead they were fighting each other, since the Irish workers on the project were about equally divided between men from North and South Ireland, Cork and Ulster. This meant a general skull cracking on religious grounds whenever two of them met.

It was a hard life for the laborers and living conditions were very bad. The dirt was moved by pick and shovel and wheelbarrows. It was the hardest kind of work, done under very difficult conditions.

There were many jobs to be done beside digging the canal. A supply of water had to be provided which usually required damming one of the tributary streams entering the Wabash River and raising its level so that water could be led from above the dam to the main canal by means of feeder canals. Aqueducts had to be built across some of the creeks. These were huge wooden troughs the width and depth of the canal and supported on posts or stone piers and with a plank tow path built on the side for horses. In some cases, streams were crossed by damming them at the opposite bank of the canal and raising the level of the creek to that of the canal thereby providing a water supply as well as a crossing.

Thus with the coming of the canal, local farmers had a market for the surplus farm goods and manufactured goods from the east were made available to them.

Soon there were passenger boats for people to travel on. I will tell about them in my next article.
Bob Quirk is a retired educator and historian. He contributes this column to the Journal Review.

http://www.journalreview.com/news/life/article_ddccf59e-8792-11e6-a46a-6b9ce8acfba0.html

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2015 Covington Apple Festival

 

COVINGTON, Ind. — The 25th annual Covington Apple Fest will fill the square around the Fountain County Courthouse on Saturday.

The day’s events actually start at 7 a.m. with the Fireman’s Pancake Breakfast at the fire station. It will be served until 10 a.m. EDT.

At 8 a.m. EDT, a bicycle tour sponsored by the Fountain Trust Co. will pedal off. Call the Covington Banking Center at (765) 793-2237 for information.

Events begin with a 9:45 a.m. EDT welcome from Mayor Brad Crain. Vendors will be set up around the courthouse until 5 p.m. EDT.

The Little Miss Apple of Your Eye and Johnny Appleseed contest will begin at 10 a.m. EDT. Registration for boys and girls ages 4-8 begins runs 9-9:30 a.m. EDT at festival headquarters.

A car, truck and motorcycle show runs during the event. Registration will be 9-11 a.m. EDT with trophies awarded at 2 p.m.

Tours of the historic courthouse murals by Kay Hunter are at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. The 1842 Fountain County Clerk’s Building/Museum at 516 Fourth St. will be open all day as well.

The Masonic Fish Fry will close out the day, serving from noon until 6:30 p.m. EDT at the fire station.

Entertainment Schedule

(All times EDT)

• 9:45 a.m. — Welcome; City of Covington Mayor and 2015 Apple Fest Queen

• 10-10:30 a.m. — Johnny Appleseed & Little Miss Apple of Your Eye Contest

• 10:30-11 a.m. — Joseph White, balloon artist, story teller, magician

• 11-11:30 a.m. — Covington High School Band

• 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. — Wabash Valley Area Band

• 12:30-1 p.m. — Forgiven

• 1:15-1:45 p.m. — Friendship Circle Center Line Dancers

• 2-2:45 p.m. — Curt Kiser

• 3-3:30 p.m. — Shozet Keller-Stump

• 3:30-4 p.m. — Sweet Adelines

• 4-5 p.m. — Kasey Burton

This report about the festival from the Commercial News:

http://www.commercial-news.com/news/local_news/covington-ready-for-apple-fest/article_4e842119-92f4-5aeb-a577-6149e5c206c0.html

Indian Creek Hill Cemetery Veterans Memorial – rural Montgomery County, IN

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Situated at the front of the Indian Creek Hill Cemetery, right next to Indiana State Road 47, this memorial commemorates all veterans. It comprises a large stone, the text of which is given below, a flag pole and flag, and a pair of stone benches.

Memorial text:-

Indian Creek Hill
Cemetery
Veterans Memorial

Dedicated to the gallant men
and women who served their
country during war and peace.

They stood, were counted and
served their country with honor.

We honor the loved ones
who waited for their return

We shall not forget.

Indian Creek Hill Cemetery is located beside Indiana State Road 47, south west of the town of New Market, between Crawfordsville and Waveland, IN.

The cemetery is situated on a small hill. The oldest graves can be found in the center of this well kept cemetery, near the top of the hill.

According to Find A Grave http://findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=85513 there are currently approximately 1475 interments.

This cemetery is located in Brown Township, and is one of the eight cemeteries in this township.

Brown Township is one of eleven townships in Montgomery County, Indiana. As of the 2010 Census, there were 1719 residents of Brown Township.

Wikipedia Brown Twp. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Township,_Montgomery_County,_Indiana

Wikipedia Montgomery County page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montgomery_County,_Indiana

This cemetery on Waymarking.com http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMKY78

This Veteran’s Memorial on Waymarking.com http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMM0HK

2015 Indiana County 4H Fair Schedule

The annual 4H county Fairs scheduled around our area include:-

Benton County July 22 – 27

Boone County July 24 – 30

Carroll County July 10 – 18

Clay County July 18 – 24

Clinton County July 11- 18

Fountain County July 17 – 23

Hendricks County July 19 – 25

Jasper County July 18 – 24

Montgomery County July 17 – 24

Newton County July 13 – 18

Parke County July 18 – 25

Putnam County July 17 – 25

Tippecanoe County July 18 – 25

Vermillion County June 19 – 26

Vigo County July 12 – 18

Warren County June 9 – 13

White County July 25 – 30

For a complete list of all the County 4H Fairs, please visit this page, on the Purdue University 4H site

http://www.four-h.purdue.edu/downloads/new/2015_County%20Fair%20Dates.pdf

Clicking the link above will open the page in a new window. A PDF reader will be required, normally already installed, but available free from https://get.adobe.com/reader/

Site revamp

I have decided to change the focus of this blog. I do not have the time to devote to two blogs, so I have combined this one with Indiana Local History., another blog I have.

To that end, the focus is now on local history, and also local events “Around Our Area”

Colin

The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana.

The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana. The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana. The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana. This once beautiful, Queen Anne style mansion, has stood on this site, at the corner of Fourth and Alabama Streets, near downtown Lafayette, Indiana,  since 1865.

As of today, Memorial Day, May 26th, 2013, it is awaiting demolition. It had served as a private residence, then in 1929, it was used as the Soller-Baker funeral home. It has stood empty since 1996. It was scheduled for renovation as apartments, or condo’s, but the project was abandoned when it became cost-prohibitive, in 2009. Eventually, the City of Lafayette, eventually bought it, with plans to demolish it and redevelop the site. There have been many additions to the original mansion, whilst it was a funeral home. The brick additions are due to be dismantled first, starting June 4th, the main part of the mansion, about a week later.

Some history of this house, that I found by online research:-

In 1842-1843, John H. Newman and his brother-in-law Abraham Miller established a brewery in the south part of Lafayette near the Wabash & Erie Canal. Miller died shortly afterward and Newman operated the brewery for several years. In December, 1856, Newman purchased a $3,500 piece of property on the east side of Illinois (now Fourth) street south of Alabama Street from James Spears, on which he built his new brewery in 1857.

At about the same time, Newman built a large Italianate brick house with a cupola adjacent to the brewery, on the southeast corner of Fourth and Alabama Streets.

John Newman died on September 1, 1888. In 1895, George A. Bohrer bought out the Newman heirs for the sum of $12,000, acquiring the Spring Brewery and the adjacent Newman House. The house was heavily remodeled for his son, Edward F. Bohrer (who was soon to marry Miss Jennie Powers), with the addition of bay windows, a turret, a large porch, a third floor, and a completely new interior.

Prohibition went into effect in Indiana at midnight on April 2, 1918, closing both Thieme & Wagner and the George A. Bohrer Brewing Co. The George A. Bohrer Bottling Works remained open until about 1929. About that time the Bohrer Products Co., apparently a successor to the brewery, began manufacturing ice cream, selling soda water, and distributing “Cereal Beverages.” The company seems to have lasted until about 1928.

https://www.indystar.com/article/BY/20130328/NEWS02/303280024/Demolitions-hold-promise-of-future-Lafayette-development

http://n2avg.com/?p=703

http://www.jconline.com/article/20130523/NEWS/305230039/Centennial-Neighborhood-eyesores-razed-by-August

http://www.b-levi.com/lafayette/breweries/bohrer.php

 

McDonald’s South, Long John’s to swap sites – journalreview.com: News

 

Crawfordsville, IN:  Soon you’ll have to go elsewhere to fulfill your McDonald’s cravings as the South Washington Street location is preparing to close. You won’t have to go far, however, as McDonald’s plans to build a new restaurant just across the street.

While building and site plans are still being revised and the sale has yet to be finalized, the tentative plan is for McDonald’s to purchase the two parcels of land that Long John Silver’s and Southside Liquors are currently on and build a new restaurant at 1509 S. Washington St., said George Lukas of the Landwater Group.

McDonald's on South Washington Street

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via McDonald’s South, Long John’s to swap sites – journalreview.com: News.