The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana.

The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana. The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana. The former Soller-Baker funeral home, in Lafayette, Indiana. This once beautiful, Queen Anne style mansion, has stood on this site, at the corner of Fourth and Alabama Streets, near downtown Lafayette, Indiana,  since 1865.

As of today, Memorial Day, May 26th, 2013, it is awaiting demolition. It had served as a private residence, then in 1929, it was used as the Soller-Baker funeral home. It has stood empty since 1996. It was scheduled for renovation as apartments, or condo’s, but the project was abandoned when it became cost-prohibitive, in 2009. Eventually, the City of Lafayette, eventually bought it, with plans to demolish it and redevelop the site. There have been many additions to the original mansion, whilst it was a funeral home. The brick additions are due to be dismantled first, starting June 4th, the main part of the mansion, about a week later.

Some history of this house, that I found by online research:-

In 1842-1843, John H. Newman and his brother-in-law Abraham Miller established a brewery in the south part of Lafayette near the Wabash & Erie Canal. Miller died shortly afterward and Newman operated the brewery for several years. In December, 1856, Newman purchased a $3,500 piece of property on the east side of Illinois (now Fourth) street south of Alabama Street from James Spears, on which he built his new brewery in 1857.

At about the same time, Newman built a large Italianate brick house with a cupola adjacent to the brewery, on the southeast corner of Fourth and Alabama Streets.

John Newman died on September 1, 1888. In 1895, George A. Bohrer bought out the Newman heirs for the sum of $12,000, acquiring the Spring Brewery and the adjacent Newman House. The house was heavily remodeled for his son, Edward F. Bohrer (who was soon to marry Miss Jennie Powers), with the addition of bay windows, a turret, a large porch, a third floor, and a completely new interior.

Prohibition went into effect in Indiana at midnight on April 2, 1918, closing both Thieme & Wagner and the George A. Bohrer Brewing Co. The George A. Bohrer Bottling Works remained open until about 1929. About that time the Bohrer Products Co., apparently a successor to the brewery, began manufacturing ice cream, selling soda water, and distributing “Cereal Beverages.” The company seems to have lasted until about 1928.

https://www.indystar.com/article/BY/20130328/NEWS02/303280024/Demolitions-hold-promise-of-future-Lafayette-development

http://n2avg.com/?p=703

http://www.jconline.com/article/20130523/NEWS/305230039/Centennial-Neighborhood-eyesores-razed-by-August

http://www.b-levi.com/lafayette/breweries/bohrer.php

 

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Sugar Creek flood, April 19th, 2013

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Elston Park, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

The historic flooding of Sugar Creek, seen at the Lafayette Avenue road bridge, over Sugar Creek, in Crawfordsville, Indiana, April 19th, 2013. The road was closed to vehicular traffic, because the water level was almost up to the top of the arches, under the bridge. The Elston Softball park was closed, because it was under water, and the Creekside Lodge restaurant and lodge, was surrounded by water.

In an article in the local newspaper, the Journal Review, of Monday April 22nd, it quotes the National Weather service;

“According to the National Weather service, Sugar Creek crested Friday afternoon [April 19th] at 15.31 feet, making it the second worst flooding event since March 27, 1913, when the creek crested at 17.30 feet. Flood stage is considered at 8.0 feet.”

These pictures were taken on the Friday afternoon, around the time the creek crested.

Then and Now, Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

The old picture for this Then and Now, is from a postcard, from about 1909.

These pictures were both taken of the railroad arch, over Jennison Street, on the west side of Crawfordsville, Indiana. Taken from the south side, of the arch, looking north.

I did not have a copy of the old picture with me, therefore the perspective is a little different.

Crawfordsville Big Four Arch bridge 1909

The Big Four Arch, Crawfordsville, In, C.1909

Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

The Big Four Arch, Crawfordsville, In, January 19th, 2013.

Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

Big 4 Arch, Crawfordsville, IN

The Stone Arch bridge over Big 4 Arch Road/Dry Branch Creek on Former Conrail Railroad/Peoria Eastern Railroad. The railroad arch spans Jennison Street, which, on the south and west side of the arch becomes Big 4 Arch road. It is situated north east of the Animal Welfare League, in Crawfordsville.

Bridge Hunter page

Big 4 Rail Road on Wikipedia