Sagamore Parkway bridge demolition

Sagamore Parkway Eastbound Bridge demolition July 12, 2016.

Today, July 12th, 2016, one of the road bridges, over the Wabash River, was demolished, using explosives. This is the latest phase in the reconstruction project, of the bridge carrying the east bound carriageway of Sagamore Parkway, formerly US52, from West Lafayette to Lafayette, Indiana.

River Road, Old State Road 43, which is situated next the Wabash River, and passes under the bridge, has been closed from Monday July 11, 2016, for approximately one month.

Traffic from the east bound bridge has been diverted onto the other, west bound bridge, temporarily. The deck had previously been stripped off of the bridge framework, and the most easterly span was removed, before the framework was demolished, at approximately 9AM, on the 12th. Crews have been given 24 hours to remove the debris from the river.

The east bound bridge is situated south of the west bound bridge, and was constructed in 1936, and is therefore older than the west bound bridge. The two bridges are of completely different designs.

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We’re Standing Tall

In 2006, the Vermillion County Community Foundation sponsored an art project involving 16 hand painted, 8 feet tall, fiberglass giraffes, on display at various locations in Vermillion County, Indiana.

To quote from an information booklet published at the time to publicize this event:-

Vermillion County, Indiana is home this summer to a unique art project – 16 eight foot tall giraffes decorate the landscape if Indiana’s longest county. Local sponsors and artists from this Western Indiana community have teamed up under the guidance of the Vermillion County Community Foundation to show their pride in being Indiana’s tallest county. The program is being so well received, the Lieutenant Governor’s Office of Tourism has even re-named State Highway 63 “Giraffe Parkway” in honor of the event.

The Foundation hopes visitors and residents alike will appreciate the giraffes which will be on display through October. Then, on November 5th they will each be auctioned off to the highest bidder to help the Foundation continue its work providing scholarships and grants to programs which showcase the county as a vibrant place to live.

The event is known as :- “Discover Surprises in Vermillion County – We’re Standing Tall”.

For further information and more pictures of these giraffes:- http://www.freewebs.com/colinsplace/giraffes/index.html

Iconic Lyons Music sign removed

Phantom Neon Signs and Graphics employees prepare to remove the iconic Lyons Music sign from its North Green Street location.

Phantom Neon Signs and Graphics employees prepare to remove the iconic Lyons Music sign from its North Green Street location.

Crawfordsville, Indiana, Wednesday, October 7, 2015

An iconic sign was lowered from its long-time, downtown perch. On Tuesday, the Lyons Music sign was removed from the front of 210 S. Green St., not to be discarded, but to be made to turn on again.

The plan is to have Phantom Neon Signs and Graphics restore the piece. Once in working order, the sign will be placed on display at the Carnegie Museum of Montgomery County.

Bernard and Robin Thompson, who bought the building that formerly housed the music store, and most recently a sewing machine shop, understood the sign represented many memories centered around music for many local residents. Many people remember buying instruments, instrument accessories and sheet music at the store.

“When we bought the building I told my husband that this sign means a lot to the people in the Crawfordsville area,” Robin said. “It hit me that we should give it to the Carnegie Museum. Looking down at the sign from the upstairs apartment we could tell it was in good shape considering how old it is.”

Crawfordsville Main Street board member Becky Hurt watched as the sign was lowered to the ground. She is happy the sign is being saved.

“I think this is marvelous that Phantom Neon can save this sign,” Hurt said. “And then, to be able to see it light up again at the museum is wonderful. I am so thankful the Thompsons are saving it and donating it for all to enjoy again. I remember having the Strand Theater sign all lit up and the Lyons Music sign lit up right on the same street. Lyons Music Store had the best selection of sheet music that you would find anywhere.”

Robin, who also is a Crawfordsville Main Street board member, has memories of taking music lessons inside the store.

“When I was a student at Tuttle Middle School we would meet our music director, Connie Meek, at Lyons Music Store,” Robin said. “We would work on our musical pieces in preparation for the contests at DePauw University.”

Taking down the sign down drew a lot of attention. Many people stopped to take photos on their phones. One motorist in particular stopped the vehicle and jumped out to find out what was going on. The man was Crawfordsville resident Rick Lyon. He asked what was going to happen to the sign, and was relieved to learn it would have a new home at the museum.

“My dad’s cousin owned the store, and if the sign was going to be junked, I was going to take it to save it,” he said. “I am thrilled with the plan that will see the sign end up in the museum. That is just great.”

The building will soon house a bakery, Maxine’s on Green. It will specialize in sweet baked goods.

Re-posted From http://www.journalreview.com/news/article_bce4ca12-6c7e-11e5-9e02-3b35517043d3.html

Lest We Forget

Today, September 11th, 2015, is the 14th anniversary of the terrorist attack, known as 9-11.

There is a memorial, in Rensselaer, Indiana, to the men and women that lost their lives in the terrorist attacks that happened on September 11th, 2001. This monument was dedicated on September 6 2012, and includes two pieces of the World Trade Center, as a monument to all who lost their lives there, at the Pentagon and on United Flight 93, that crashed in rural Pennsylvania.

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The monument is facing the Jasper County Court House, in front of the Rensselaer Volunteer Fire Department building, on the corner of South Cullen and East Harrison Streets, in downtown Rensselaer, Indiana.

Text on the memorial:

IN MEMORY OF ALL THOSE WHO
LOST THEIR LIVES AND TO
THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES TO
SAVE SO MANY OTHERS ON
SEPTEMBER 11, 2011

THEIR COURAGE AND LOVE OF
OUR COUNTRY WILL BE A SOURCE
OF STRENGTH AND COMFORT
TO OUR GREAT NATION
GOD BLESS AMERICA

Physical address of memorial:
203 S. Cullen St
Rensselaer, Indiana USA
47978

Further Information:
Rensselaer Republican Newspaper Website for more information: (visit link)

RVFD unveils Sept.11 memorial (visit link)

City of Rensselaer Fire Department (visit link)

RVFD Online (visit link)

This memorial on Waymarking.com

Sugar Creek flood, April 19th, 2013

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Flood water by the Lafayette Avenue road bridge over Sugar Creek, April 19th, 2013.

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Creekside Lodge restaurant surrounded by flood water

Elston Park, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

Elston Park, under water, April 19, 2013.

The historic flooding of Sugar Creek, seen at the Lafayette Avenue road bridge, over Sugar Creek, in Crawfordsville, Indiana, April 19th, 2013. The road was closed to vehicular traffic, because the water level was almost up to the top of the arches, under the bridge. The Elston Softball park was closed, because it was under water, and the Creekside Lodge restaurant and lodge, was surrounded by water.

In an article in the local newspaper, the Journal Review, of Monday April 22nd, it quotes the National Weather service;

“According to the National Weather service, Sugar Creek crested Friday afternoon [April 19th] at 15.31 feet, making it the second worst flooding event since March 27, 1913, when the creek crested at 17.30 feet. Flood stage is considered at 8.0 feet.”

These pictures were taken on the Friday afternoon, around the time the creek crested.